Special warnings and precautions for use Paediatric population


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Special warnings and precautions for use
Paediatric population

The use of drugs of the tetracycline class during tooth development (last half of pregnancy; infancy and childhood to the age of 8 years) may cause permanent discolouration of the teeth (yellow-grey-brown). This adverse reaction is more common during long-term use of the drugs but has been observed following repeated short-term courses. Enamel hypoplasia has also been reported. Use doxycycline in paediatric patients aged younger than 8 years only when the potential benefits are expected to outweigh the risks in severe or life-threatening conditions (e.g. Rocky Mountain spotted fever), only when there are no adequate alternative therapies.

Although the risk of permanent teeth staining is rare in children aged 8 years to less than 12 years, the use of doxycycline should be carefully justified in situations where other drugs are not available, are not likely to be effective or are contraindicated.

Photosensitivity: Photosensitivity manifested by an exaggerated sunburn reaction has been observed in some individuals taking tetracyclines, including doxycycline. Patients likely to be exposed to direct sunlight or ultraviolet light should be advised that this reaction can occur with tetracycline drugs and treatment should be discontinued at the first evidence of skin erythema.

Use in patients with impaired hepatic function: Doxycycline should be administered with caution to patients with hepatic impairment or those receiving potentially hepatotoxic drugs. Abnormal hepatic function has been reported rarely and has been caused by both the oral and parenteral administration of tetracyclines, including doxycycline.

Use in patients with renal impairment: Excretion of doxycycline by the kidney is about 40%/72 hours in individuals with normal renal function. This percentage excretion may fall to a range as low as 1-5%/72 hours in individuals with severe renal insufficiency (creatinine clearance below 10ml/min). Studies have shown no significant difference in the serum half-life of doxycycline in individuals with normal and severely impaired renal function. Haemodialysis does not alter the serum half-life of doxycycline. The anti-anabolic action of the tetracyclines may cause an increase in blood urea. Studies to date indicate that this anti-anabolic effect does not occur with the use of doxycycline in patients with impaired renal function.

Microbiological overgrowth: The use of antibiotics may occasionally result in over-growth of non-susceptible organisms, including Candida. If a resistant organism appears, the antibiotic should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.

Pseudomembranous colitis has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including doxycycline, and has ranged in severity from mild to life-threatening. It is important to consider this diagnosis in patients who present with diarrhoea subsequent to the administration of antibacterial agents.

Clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) has been reported with use of nearly all antibiotics, including doxycycline, and has ranged in severity from mild diarrhoea to fatal colitis. Treatment with antibacterial agents alters the normal flora of the colon leading to overgrowth of C. difficile. C. difficile produces toxins A and B, which contribute to development of CDAD. Hypertoxin producing strains of C. difficile cause increased morbidity and mortality, as these infections can be refractory to antimicrobial therapy and may require colectomy. CDAD should be considered in all patients who present with diarrhoea after antibiotic treatment. Careful medical history is necessary since CDAD has been reported to occur over two months after the administration of antibacterial agents.

Oesophagitis: instances of oesophagitis and oesophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients receiving capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline class, including doxycycline. Most of these patients took medications immediately before going to bed or with inadequate amounts of fluid.

Bulging fontanelles in infants and benign intracranial hypertension in juveniles and adults have been reported in individuals receiving full therapeutic drugs. These conditions disappeared rapidly when the drug was discontinued.

Porphyria: There have been rare reports of porphyria in patients receiving tetracyclines.

Venereal disease: When treating venereal diseases, where coexistent syphilis is suspected, proper diagnostic procedures, including dark-field examinations, should be utilised. In all such cases monthly serological tests should be made for at least four months.

Beta-haemolytic streptococci infections: Infections due to Group A beta-haemolytic Streptococci should be treated for at least 10 days.

Myasthenia gravis: Due to a potential for weak neuromuscular blockade, care should be taken in administering tetracyclines to patients with myasthenia gravis.

Systemic lupus erythematous: Tetracyclines can cause exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction: Some patients with spirochete infections may experience a Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction shortly after doxycycline treatment is started. Patients should be reassured that this is a usually self-limiting consequence of antibiotic treatment of spirochete infections.

Methoxyflurane: Caution is advised in administering tetracyclines with methoxyflurane (see section 4.5).