A 75‑year‑old male presented in Emergency Department with acute‑onset horizontal diplopia

A 75‑year‑old male presented in Emergency Department
with acute‑onset horizontal diplopia. Clinical
examination depicted a conjugate gaze palsy, and the
eyes could not be driven past midline to the right with
fast head rotation, smooth pursuit, convergence, or
saccades. However, bilateral pupils were normal in
size with immediate direct light reflexes. He had facial
weakness on the right (failure of forehead wrinkling,
lower eyelid ectropion, inadequate eye blink, brow
ptosis, flattened nasolabial fold, and a right mouth droop),
No other deficits were present. He was prescribed aspirin and ocular motility, and the seventh nerve function gradually improved. The patient was neurologically intact 3 months after initial presentation. where the lesion most likely occurred ?
facial colliculus syndrome affect both abducens and facial nerve fibers. Maybe due to vascular or pontine glioma.
Two structures must be damaged due to the description part of this question: abducent nerve (nucleus) and facial nerve. Crossection of the pons at the level of the facial colliculus is shown. But the options are tricky because of two structures. It isn’t clear what was mentioned as conjugate gaze palsy and inability to move eyes past midline.

So probably the level of lesion May correspond to option E (abducent nucleus) with involvement of fibers of facial nerve or F (facial colliculus) with involvement of abducent nucleus. This question has nice idea and goal, but some improvements are required.