The lens of the eye develops from the surface ectoderm

The lens of the eye develops from the surface ectoderm, which is one of the three primary germ layers that forms during embryonic development. The surface ectoderm gives rise to a variety of tissues and structures in the body, including the skin, hair, nails, and parts of the eyes, ears, and nose.

During early embryonic development, the surface ectoderm overlying the developing head region thickens and invaginates to form a structure called the optic vesicle. The optic vesicle eventually becomes the retina, which lines the back of the eye and detects light and visual information.

At the same time, a portion of the surface ectoderm overlying the optic vesicle thickens and forms the lens placode. The lens placode invaginates to form the lens pit, which eventually separates from the surface ectoderm to form the lens vesicle. The cells of the lens vesicle differentiate into the lens fibers that make up the bulk of the mature lens.

In summary, the lens of the eye develops from the surface ectoderm, which invaginates to form the lens placode, lens pit, and lens vesicle. The cells of the lens vesicle differentiate into the lens fibers that make up the mature lens.