Thickness of endometrium

Thickness of endometrium

The thickness of the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus, varies throughout the menstrual cycle and can also be influenced by hormonal factors and medical conditions. In general, the endometrial thickness is measured on ultrasound and reported in millimeters (mm).

The normal endometrial thickness depends on the phase of the menstrual cycle and the age of the woman. In the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle (days 5-14), when the endometrium is growing and thickening in preparation for a potential pregnancy, the normal thickness can range from 2-14 mm. In the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle (days 15-28), when the endometrium is more mature and preparing for implantation of a fertilized egg, the normal thickness can range from 7-16 mm.

Outside of the menstrual cycle, the normal endometrial thickness in premenopausal women is usually less than 8 mm. After menopause, the endometrial thickness should be less than 5 mm, as the endometrium atrophies and becomes thinner due to the lack of estrogen.

An endometrial thickness measurement that is significantly outside of these ranges may indicate a medical condition or hormonal imbalance, such as polyps, fibroids, endometrial hyperplasia, or cancer. Therefore, if the endometrial thickness is abnormal on ultrasound, further evaluation and management may be necessary.