Which is the Earliest response to Iron therapy in IDA is Erythroid hyperplasia, or / Rise in serum iron?

Which is the Earliest response to Iron therapy in IDA is Erythroid hyperplasia, or / Rise in serum iron ?

The earliest response to iron therapy in iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is typically an increase in serum iron levels. When iron is administered orally or intravenously, it is absorbed into the bloodstream and becomes available for use in various physiological processes, including erythropoiesis (red blood cell production).

After iron supplementation, serum iron levels begin to rise as the absorbed iron is transported by transferrin to the bone marrow for incorporation into developing red blood cells. This increase in serum iron provides the necessary substrate for hemoglobin synthesis and erythropoiesis, leading to the production of new red blood cells.

While erythroid hyperplasia (increased production of red blood cells) is an important subsequent response to iron therapy, it typically occurs after the initial increase in serum iron levels and the beginning of hemoglobin synthesis.

Therefore, the earliest detectable response to iron therapy in IDA is the rise in serum iron levels, followed by an increase in hemoglobin concentration and erythropoiesis as the newly formed red blood cells mature and enter circulation.