Early type 1 diabetes shortens women's lives by 18 years


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Early type 1 diabetes shortens women’s lives by 18 years

  • Women who developed type 1 diabetes before the age of ten years die an average of nearly 18 years earlier than women who do not have diabetes.

  • Men in the corresponding situation lose almost 14 years of life.

  • The lives of patients diagnosed at age 26-30 years are shortened by an average of ten years.

  • The probability of severe cardiovascular disease generally proved to be 30 times higher for those who developed type 1 diabetes before the age of ten years than for controls.

  • With a diagnosis of diabetes at the age of 26-30 years, the corresponding risk increased by a factor of six.

  • One of the highest increases in risk noted in the study involved heart attacks in women who developed type 1 diabetes before the age of ten years.

  • The risk for these women is 90 times higher than for controls without diabetes.
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    Araz Rawshani, Naveed Sattar, Stefan Franzén, Aidin Rawshani, Andrew T Hattersley, Ann-Marie Svensson, Björn Eliasson, Soffia Gudbjörnsdottir. Excess mortality and cardiovascular disease in young adults with type 1 diabetes in relation to age at onset: a nationwide, register-based cohort study. The Lancet, 2018; 392 (10146): 477 DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(18)31506-X